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Jeremy Charles Stewart Fulford Smithies

Contacts
01481 246675
  • Parish Vale
  • Experience Current Deputy
What do you think?
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Personal Statement

I have lived in the Vale since 1998. I was elected to the Vale Douzaine in 2003 and continue to serve as a Douzainier, I am currently Vice-Dean of the Vale Douzaine and I represent the Vale Parish on the Guernsey Douzaine Forum. I also serve on the Baubigny Schools Committee (St Sampson’s High and Le Murier). In 2015 I was elected People’s Churchwarden at the Vale Church.

  • The population of the Bailiwick has responded magnificently to the Covid crisis – now it is vital to begin the economic recovery.
  • Education - the two-school model is not suitable for Guernsey and I would support a move to a three-school solution.
  • The Island’s energy strategy should be prioritised to assist the economic recovery.
  • Population management - Employment permits need to be tailored to meet the needs of business whilst not allowing unlimited growth in population.

Manifesto

Experience

I am a Chartered Engineer and a Member of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. I was awarded a Master of Business Administration degree in 1992, having previously earned a BSc (Hons) in Mechanical Engineering and a BA in Systems and Organisation Management.

From 1985 to 1998 I worked for Rolls-Royce Military Aero-Engines, initially as a Design Engineer and later as a Business Planning Manager. I moved to Rolls-Royce, France, as a Resident Overseas Executive, involved in all aspects of engineering, manufacturing and commercial business. I have wide ranging management experience at an international level.

Following my return to Guernsey, I joined Dynex Technologies, before going on to work as Financial Director for Sarnia Technologies and Instrumentation Ltd. I qualified as a teacher in 2000 and taught mathematics, first at Elizabeth College and then at Blanchelande Girls’ College until 2010. From 2011 I was employed as a Management Accounts consultant until my election as a Deputy in 2016.

I served as Vice-President of the States’ Trading Supervisory Board throughout the last States term, helping to create, from scratch, an efficient and effective Board. Its mission was to reflect a commercial mind-set throughout the operations of the trading assets, whilst acting in the Island’s long-term interest in the provision of vital services, holding firm to the vision that the trading assets would be a group of well-managed, efficient businesses that deliver a return, not necessarily financial, in the long-term best interests of islanders. I currently represent STSB on the Guernsey Water and Guernsey Waste shadow-Boards and am Chairperson of the Nominations and the Lottery sub-Committees and President of the Pilotage Board.

I am a member of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association, Guernsey Branch Executive Committee and represented the Island at the 64th Parliamentary Conference in September last year.

I joined the Committee for Home Affairs in September 2019. The committee is particularly busy with such matters as Justice and Security as well as Brexit, International Standards, Strategic Population and the Children & Young Peoples’ Plan.

As the space on this manifesto is limited, please check out my website or contact me at my home address:-

La Haize, Rue des Haizes, Vale, GY3 5HB

or phone on 246675 or email and I will send you a full copy of my manifesto.

Answers to questions proposed by the public:

Most of the detailed work of the States is done in committees, like the Committee for Environment and Infrastructure. What experience do you have of being on a committee and how did you contribute?

I have been involved with committee work in one way and another since 1975. However, I believe this question relates to my involvement with committees of the States for Guernsey. Since my election in 2016 I have been Vice President of the States' Trading Supervisory Board and chair three sub-Committees. For a brief time I was a member of the Development and Planning Authority but resigned after a few months because of conflict with my STSB work. I joined the Committee for Home Affairs in 2019 and in the same year I was also elected to the Executive Committee of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association Guernsey branch.

With unemployment currently running at an all time high, what measures would you like in place to ensure local people are offered jobs before license holders ?

Employment permits are issued to employers who must demonstrate that there is a local shortage of qualified workers.

What concrete measures would you like to see implemented in Guernsey during the next term to achieve net zero carbon by 2050?

The people of Guernsey are already responding well to calls for carbon offsetting. Guernsey is working towards a carbon-free environment. For example GP now has a fleet of electric delivery vehicles powered from the largest solar panel array in the Channel Islands. Local take -up of electric cars is growing. My wife and I each have an all electric car and have done for two years. Emphasis should be to try to influence major polluters to adopt similar measures.

I live in St Peter Port but have interests in the Vale, St Peters and Castel. Will you be looking at Island Wide issues or more so in your Parish of residence?

I was elected to the Vale Douzaine in 2003 and as a deputy for the Vale electoral district in 2016 and clearly represented my Parish. However under the new system of Island wide voting I will, if elected, be representing the whole island and that is what I will do. I am already involved in the island wide waste strategy amongst other initiatives.

Are you concerned about the large amount of agricultural land that is being lost for private gardens?

The loss of any agricultural land is not to be taken lightly and I am concerned about the amount lost for use as gardens is this is controlled by the DPA and I hope that they are monitoring this closely.

You will make many commitments as a politician, but how will you actually ensure these are achieved? If you have been a deputy before, what will you do differently this term to improve achievements?

Guernsey has consensus government. This means that when a committee brings a policy letter to the states individual members are able to try to influence others on whether to accept, amend or reject that policy letter. It is of course possible for individual members to seek to get support from six other members to bring requettes to alter existing policies or to introduce new policy initiatives.

What are your opinions on climate change and Guernsey's role in tackling it?

Guernsey people have nothing to be ashamed of in their approach to and acceptance of the need to protect that environment. We are recycling well ahead of the rest of the world and embracing low carbon emission. The number of electric vehicles on the road is increasing daily. All our imported electricity is warranted to be from renewable or green sources. We need to be holding up a mirror to other big industrial countries that are installing coal fired power stations at and ever increasing rate. Let us call them out.

What are the attributes and skills you will be looking for in the next President of the Policy & Resources Committee?

Leadership, economic competence (not accountancy skills), practical experience of business and a global awareness. A wish to knuckle down to addressing the vital issues and not to be diverted by vanity projects.

If the independent Cost Benefit Analysis supports lengthening the airport runway, would you vote in favour of investing in this key element of island infrastructure?

The Frontier Economics report says "The economic benefits of extending the runway are likely to outweigh the costs over a 40 year period.". It further says, "annual greenhouse gas emissions would increase by up to 12 kilotonnes per year (equivalent to around 5% of Guernsey’s annual greenhouse gas emissions). The social cost of these emissions over the 40-year life of the project is around £9 million (net present value)." On the title page it says, "Provisional Analysis: findings will be reviewed in light of the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on air travel". Times have changed. Let's keep an open mind and wait and see.

Do you believe that diversification of the island's tax base is an important consideration for Guernsey in today's volatile and fast-moving global economy? If so, how can this specifically be achieved for Guernsey?

Rather than introducing new taxes I would prefer to see those we already have kept as low as possible. The temptation to increase tax or introduce new forms of taxation should be resisted, strong evidence shows that economies prosper under low taxation. Competition, free enterprise and public service should be encouraged. I am interested in investigating some form of territorial taxation where any profits generated in Guernsey are taxed in Guernsey. This has been proposed before but I am unaware of any serious attempt to carry the proposal forward.

What are the candidates' views on maternity pay and leave and how would they improve the current arrangements, if at all?

If we as a community or employers can afford it then I see nothing wrong with supporting families when they are most in need or when the welfare of mother and child are most important. Whether such pay should be extended to fathers I am less convinced because of the need to limit public expenditure.

I believe Guernsey needs a vision; a forward-thinking concept for the future of the island’s infrastructure, community wellbeing and economy. What’s yours?

I have held firm to the vision that the States' trading assets would be a group of well-managed, efficient businesses that deliver a return, not necessarily financial, in the long-term best interests of islanders. That was decided early on by the States' Trading Supervisory Board (STSB) of which I have been a part, as vice-President throughout this 4 1/2 year term. Our constitution was to combine two elected members and two independent non-States voting members into a Board which would reflect a commercial mind-set throughout the operations of the trading assets, whilst acting in the Island’s long-term interest in the provision of vital services. My vision for the States of Deliberation as a whole would be for a purposeful, pragmatic and practical approach to solving the serious problems facing the Island, using local expertise where ever possible as they would have an in depth knowledge of the Island ways and culture.

Do you agree that people should be encouraged to use cars less and if so what measures would you like to see introduced to achieve this?

I do not support legislation or penalties to discourage car use. There are many people in the island who are reliant on their cars to be able to carry out their daily business. However, I am not opposed to making life easier for those who choose, voluntarily, to reduce or give up car use. There are practical difficulties in providing for alternatives which are mainly caused by overcrowding, narrow lanes and delays caused by slow moving traffic.

Do you support outsourcing of States services?

Out sourcing can be a very useful means of covering temporary workloads or dealing with simple tasks. There is no need to maintain a large permanent staff and to have to re-train and re-deploy them. Where outsourcing becomes more difficult is in areas of specialist knowledge where it is neither easy nor cost effective to have to employ outside resources.

What will you do to educate the islanders about the reality of the climate crisis which is the biggest threat currently facing the world?

I concede that there is a large body of evidence which supports those who think that we are facing a catastrophe due to climate change but there is also an equally large evidence base which suggests that the world is passing through a recurring cycle. I cannot accept that we are in crisis but it is prudent to take steps, where possible to mitigate human impact on our environment. Guernsey people have nothing to be ashamed of in their approach to and acceptance of the need to protect that environment. We are recycling well ahead of the rest of the world and embracing low carbon emission. The number of electric vehicles on the road is increasing daily. All our imported electricity is warranted to be from renewable or green sources. We need to be holding up a mirror to other big industrial countries that are installing coal fired power stations at and ever increasing rate. Let us call them out.

Most environmental problems are caused by the love of growth. Would you consider de-growth?

That would be an interesting question to ask those near to the breadline or in unemployment. We need to sustain growth in the economy and I dispute the premise that most environmental problems are caused by it.

What intra island transport strategy would you support to ensure safe and ‘clean’ travel on island for all road users, pedestrians, cyclists and motorists? And how do you plan to deliver that plan financially?

Clean travel can be achieved through the gradual phasing out of petrol and diesel vehicles. Electric vehicles are ideal for Guernsey and technology is moving forward to introduce hydrogen power derived from and returning to water. Electrolosis powered by solar energy being used.

What environmental policies would you support to reduce Guernsey’s reliance on the internal combustion engine, in support of International global warming initiatives?

The truth is that our reliance on hydrocarbons is already becoming a thing of the past. Renewables and nuclear energy are in most part providing Guernseys electricity supply. For the future I am convinced that new forms of energy will start to be exploited. For example hydrogen fuel cells are already being developed for use in cars and aircraft. Hydrogen is electrolysed from water using green electricity and when burnt returns in combination with oxygen to water.

What measures will you put in place during the next term to ensure that environmental biodiversity will be protected and enhanced?

I will support properly costed and researched biodiversity projects but will be careful to try to discount 'bright ideas' dreamt up in enthusiastic brain storms. We must try to avoid building on greenfield sites and to preserve what open spaces and trees we have.

The Guernsey Press had an article and a picture of a proposed East Coast development called HYDROPORT. It seemed to me to be a brilliant plan and included a new deep water harbour, a hydro electric supply by enclosing Belgrave bay and changes to St Peter port harbour to accommodate cruise liners and super yachts. It would provide jobs, produce an ongoing and substantial revenue stream and make us to some extent self-reliant on electricity, why has there been no update on this project?

This is a well presented project but there are many difficulties to be overcome before it can move forward. Just look at the problems arising from a fairly modest scheme to accommodate inert waste at the southern end of the existing land reclamation site at Longue Hougue. The Sea Front Enhancement Group is considering several different proposals for the East coast and will report back to the States before too long. The sooner the better as far as I am concerned.

Do you agree that there is a climate crisis caused predominantly by the actions of humans?

I do not believe that we are fundamentally in a crisis situation and I am confident that a technological solution will be found to overcome the short-term problems which exist. I concede that there is a large body of evidence which supports those who think that we are facing a catastrophe due to climate change but there is also an equally large evidence base which suggests that the world is passing through a recurring cycle. I cannot accept that we are in crisis but it is prudent to take steps, where possible to mitigate human impact on our environment. Guernsey people have nothing to be ashamed of in their approach to and acceptance of the need to protect that environment. We are recycling well ahead of the rest of the world and embracing low carbon emission. The number of electric vehicles on the road is increasing daily. All our imported electricity is warranted to be from renewable or green sources. We need to be holding up a mirror to other big industrial countries that are installing coal fired power stations at and ever increasing rate. Let us call them out.

Longue Hougue has been proposed as a site for inert waste disposal despite it being a site of international importance in terms of wildlife. La Societe Guernesiase and other scientists have advised against this. What will you do to ensure that this valuable habitat is protected?

There are, currently, three contentious environmental issues at Longue Hougue South. The scaly cricket population, the eel-grass on the seabed and the rock formation of St Peter Port gabbro. The scaly cricket is nowhere as rare as it was first thought - there are colonies on the west coast and in Alderney and doubtless others will be found. I am reluctant to disturb the crickets but I believe they will be sensible and move when lump of rock begin to be placed near their habitat - work will be slow and there will be time for the creatures to adapt. The eel-grass may need a little more time to re-establish itself but, again, this is not a rare plant and it has, elsewhere, survived being harvested for domestic and industrial use. The gabbro is not going to be removed, it will be partially covered by the new retaining wall but will still be there.

Most scientists and experts agree that a target of 2050 to achieve ‘net zero’ carbon emissions is nowhere near ambitious enough and will have catastrophic consequences around the world. What will you do to ensure that Guernsey takes action to significantly reduce carbon emissions during the next term?

Guernsey people have nothing to be ashamed of in their approach to and acceptance of the need to reduce carbon emission. We are embracing low carbon and the number of electric vehicles on the road testifies. All our electricity is warranted to be from renewable or green sources. We need to be holding up a mirror to other big industrial countries that are installing coal fired power stations at and ever increasing rate. Let us call them out.

What is your view on current spending on Aurigny, is it worth how much we are paying? Is it run efficiently? Did we need new aircraft?

Aurigny is our lifeline. In normal times its losses were being brought under control. It is currently running a huge deficit but it is still running which is more than can be said for FlyBe. Blue Islands is hanging in but has received considerable help from JERSEY. Remember also that Aurigny provide a lifeline service to Alderney operating under difficult conditions. If any airline is going to be viable it will need to replace its aircrafty for economy and efficiency. The case for the new aircraft was rigorously tested and found to be good. What happened subsequently was totally unforeseen but the aircraft are operating and are maintaining our links. the Public Service O for Alderney and the Memorandum of Understanding between the States and the Company will need to be revisited next term and, if elected, I would hope to be involved in those renegotiations.

If elected, would you fully support the retention, repair and ongoing maintenance of the Sea Defences provided by the anti-tank wall at L’Ancresse Bay?

I voted against the policy letter brought by environments and infrastructure which proposed the removal of part of the sea defence anti-tank wall at L'Ancresse. It made no sense to me then nor does it now .The cost of removing the wall was quoted at £1 million whilst another option for repairing the wall was costed at £500,000. I could see no point in embarking on a project with so many unknowns what would happen to the common behind the wall once it was removed; what would be the effect of putting huge piles of stones on a glorious beach? The whole venture seemed to me at the time to be ill considered. Were it to come before the States again I would certainly vote the same way - that is, against removal of the wall and in favour of carrying out repairs on the existing structure.

A significant proportion of the concerns about the two college model of secondary education related to the capital costs and space standards: they could have been addressed with higher spending. Would you be prepared to spend more money on the future model of secondary education than previously agreed by the States in September 2019? If so, how much more?

I would not be prepared to spend that money because I do not now agree with the two school model. My preferred option would be a three school model whether it be 3 11 to 18 schools or 2 11 to 16 and 1 11 to 18 using existing buildings. If more money is found to be needed then we will be in new territory but we are investing in education for at least the next 30 years let's get it right.

With the general increase in costs of running the island and with various capital projects requiring funding; and with limitations on the amount that islanders can be taxed; do you think that it may be time to revisit the 0-10 tax scheme that created a big black hole in the island's finances?

I always thought the zero 10 policy was ill-advised. Just because Jersey and the Isle of Man were going down that route I saw no reason why Guernsey should follow suit. We should continue to tax profits made in Guernsey at the prevailing corporation tax rate as any profit taken out of the island will be taxed at some point anyway. Why should we forego tax on profits, simply to deliver it to the Chancellor of the Exchequer or another jurisdictions taxation coffers

If elected, what priority will you give to the introduction of the already-drafted consumer protection legislation?

I am, in principle, in favour of consumer protection and would support reasonable measures to introduce legislation. Where I am hesitant to offer whole-hearted support is in the area of Regulation. I am confident that the States owned utilities are well-managed and can be well regulated without the need for expensive Offices of Regulation modelled on UK equivalents set up to deal with multiple providers who have many shareholders to satisfy. Unnecessary regulation is costly and that cost is borne by consumers.

Did you know that same-sex families aren't treated equally when it comes to registering the birth of a child? What will you do to change that?

The inequality arises because no-one ever considered such a situation arising. The norms of centuries have been challenged and are being overturned. It will take a while for things to change and time is necessary to avoid any unintended consequences. It is frustrating for people who find themselves in what they see to be an ufair and unjust position but the rest of us need a little time to adjust and come to terms with what is happening.

Would you support a programme of privatisation of island utilities and other facilities such as Beau Sejour to help reduce record levels of borrowing resulting from the cost of Covid defences?

It has been argued that privatisation was necessary in the UK to create greater efficiencies in nationalised indutries and utilities. Doubtless there have been some benefits from introducing competition but there has also been a downside in that control of vital businesses has moved overseas and the profits have flowed out of the UK. Here, the utility companies and trading assets are overseen by the STSB, are well run and well organised and are delivering excellent service to islanders at reasonable prices. What benefit would there be to privatise them in order to see any money made go into dividends paid to individuals rather than seeing it reinvested on behalf of islanders to maintain the excellent services they are receiving and improve the infrastructure.

Increasing home working will likely result in surplus office space. Will you encourage an urgent revision of Planning Policies to facilitate conversion of retail and office space to residential & curb green-field development?

It is far too early to predict whether homeworking will continue as it is or not there is already evidence been gathered in the UK concerning the psychological benefits or dis benefits of homeworking and for Guernsey with such short commuting distances it may be difficult to justify the continuation of working from home. However, there may be cases where homeworking is proved to be beneficial in which case doubtless alternative uses will start to be found for office accommodation. Not long ago several of the current office developments were for example an hotel, a cinema and a gasworks. Times change. A word of caution, if employers find that work can be done satisfactorily in Câtel then why cannot it be done in Calcutta where the wages are lower?

What is your attitude towards enhanced and mandatory registration, chipping and DNA recording of dogs and control of their fouling, island-wide?

In an already overcrowded island, widespread dog ownership can cause problems. I support the registration and micro chipping of dogs but I think perhaps DNA recording is going a step too far at the moment. To police antisocial dog fouling by setting up another layer of bureaucracy with expensive dog wardens seems to me to be over-reacting. The one-off cost of micro chipping is one thing but the added annual cost of administering a complicated monitoring scheme seems unnecessary.

I have one question for sitting Deputies and one for new candidates. Deputies:- what, in your mind, was your greatest political achievement in the last four years? New candidates:- What is your biggest political goal in the next four years?

Beyond doubt, for me, the implementation of the waste strategy. The construction and commissioning of the waste transfer station a Longue Hougue and the introduction of widespread recycling was undoubtedly one of the major milestones of the last four years. The installation of the largest solar panel array in the Channel Islands at the post office and the use of the power generated to drive the new electric vehicle fleet as well as to put power back into the grid, was also another remarkable achievement. Also, the negotiation with electricity defaults to ensure that all the power coming in through the undersea cable is derived from manoeuvre sources was yet another example of how Guernsey is delivering on its environmental responsibilities.

How good are your mediation and conciliation skills? The key to the islands well-being and progress is in working together to achieve the projects approved - to see sustainable, innovative solutions. Leadership in pulling the team together to move forward, rather than in circles.

As good as any and better than most. During my career whilst employed by Rolls-Royce Military Aero Engines Limited in Bristol I was involved in international contract negotiations and worked with Company Directors to develop existing business relationships. I have the ability to interact and establish good rapport at all levels of an organisation and with people of all ages and backgrounds. I have successfully managed domestic and overseas staff and have established professional and working relationships with many European entities.

Would you support not giving Local Market licenses to those earning above a set level to support both LM and OM?

I think that the Population Management Policy is working quite well at the moment. During the COVID crisis greater flexibility was introduced but now we are operating as normal and companies are applying for permits within the regulations for employees who have skills which are in short supply locally to be granted permits.

Would you support changes in the law to make cannabis for personal use legal?

As a stupefying recreational drug: No. As a medicinal derivative under prescription by a licensed medical practitioner: Yes.

In 1945, the generosity of people outside Guernsey enabled the delivery of Red Cross parcels to the island on the SS Vega. What is your view on the statement that ‘charity begins at home but should not end there’? How can we best show our care for people in need in other parts of the world?

You have encapsulated both sides of the argument. Carefully administered overseas aid is only right and proper if it is targeted on deprived and suffering people. It might be true that individuals and charities in Guernsey are better at delivering aid where it is needed but I think it is sometimes necessary for Government to be seen to be entering into the arena. Where this might not be proper would be if aid were to be distributed elsewhere whilst worse deprivation was being tolerated domestically, but we have not reached that point. I referred to carefully administered aid - it would be quite immoral if aid were to be diverted into the pockets of corrupt regimes.

Considering the mounting public pressure against the way our current justice system deals with cannabis offences, what is your stance on the legalisation and regulation of cannabis in Guernsey?

As a stupefying recreational drug: No. As a medicinal derivative under prescription by a licensed medical practitioner: Yes.

In a review last year into drugs and treatments and States debate in January, HSC acknowledged that the disparity between life changing NICE TA drugs available in Guernsey compared to the NHS had become too great to be justified, with nearly 4000 patients now on sub-optimal treatments. The Guernsey Health Reserve was identified as the funding source. HSC announced last week a delay of at least a year to the implementation of this policy. How do you propose to tackle the pace at which change takes place within the States? Should you be held accountable for delivering on commitments you make individually, as a committee or collectively as the States?

As a signatory to the requête which brought about this change I am obviously very keen to see it implemented. However, as with so many things at the moment the cost cannot be ignored nor can the added workload which has descended upon Health and Social Care Committee as a result of the pandemic. Every Deputy is accountable for his or her actions and if the electorate are dissatisfied with their performance they can expect to be removed from future assemblies. It is contended that several lost their seats in 2016 because of their policies on education.

Earlier this year, the States passed the introduction of life-saving and life-changing NICE-Approved drugs & medicines by a massive 32-1 vote; these drugs are readily available under the NHS and SHS in the UK. HSC have now announced that the implementation of this is now to be delayed by a year or so. Out of all projects the States have on their list - this has to be THE single most important one because it will affect up to 4,000+ residents of our island. How do you intend to bring forward the delay of this incredibly important topic to a much quicker implementation date?

As a signatory to the requête which brought about this change I am obviously very keen to see it implemented. However, as with so many things at the moment the cost cannot be ignored nor can the added workload which has descended upon Health and Social Care Committee as a result of the pandemic.

What would you do to address traffic noise pollution from vehicles speeding and backfiring along St Georges Esplanade/Les Banques and towards town?

This matter has been allowed to drift for far too long. Legislation was introduced many years ago to try to stop this antisocial behaviour. However what was lacking was an objective and definitive test to determine what constituted excessive noise . This can and should be easily remedied, for example environmental health officers are able to install monitoring equipment to determine the dB level from industrial facilities or noisy neighbours, so it should be a simple matter to say that any vehicle registering more than e.g. 85 dB from a range of 20 feet at 3/4 max revs is in contravention of the law and should be taken off the road until remedial action has been taken.

In January 2020 the States passed a policy to make all NICE TA drugs and treatments available to Islanders. Do you see this as a priority and if so how would you expedite implementation?

As a signatory to the requête which brought about this change I am obviously very keen to see it implemented. However, as with so many things at the moment the cost cannot be ignored nor can the added workload which has descended upon Health and Social Care Committee as a result of the pandemic.

The recent Frontier report on the runway extension summed up that "the economic benefits of extending the runway are likely to outweigh the costs" with net benefits over 40 years of up to £687m (over £20k per household). Post COVID, do you support continued investigation into the potential for a runway extension to improve Guernsey's infrastructure, air links, and sustain the visitor economy?

The Frontier Economics report says "The economic benefits of extending the runway are likely to outweigh the costs over a 40 year period.". It further says, "annual greenhouse gas emissions would increase by up to 12 kilotonnes per year (equivalent to around 5% of Guernsey’s annual greenhouse gas emissions). The social cost of these emissions over the 40-year life of the project is around £9 million (net present value)." On the title page it says, "Provisional Analysis: findings will be reviewed in light of the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on air travel". Times have changed. Let's keep an open mind and wait and see.

Have you been made aware that every report that the SOG has commissioned for 20 years has flagged the need to extend the runway to circa 1700m+ and the commercial benefits it will bring for the island as a whole?

The Frontier Economics report says "The economic benefits of extending the runway are likely to outweigh the costs over a 40 year period.". It further says, "annual greenhouse gas emissions would increase by up to 12 kilotonnes per year (equivalent to around 5% of Guernsey’s annual greenhouse gas emissions). The social cost of these emissions over the 40-year life of the project is around £9 million (net present value)." On the title page it says, "Provisional Analysis: findings will be reviewed in light of the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on air travel". Times have changed. Let's keep an open mind and wait and see.

Brexit presents a unique opportunity for Guernsey to strengthen its ties with other Commonwealth countries and stand on its own two feet on an international scale. Would you be willing to make an effort to strengthen our diplomatic ties to countries like New Zealand, Australia, and Canada?

The countries you mention are all members of the Commonwealth of Nations. I have been a supporter of the Commonwealth for many years. I am a former President of the Guernsey branch of the RCS and I entertained the Canadian High Commissioner here in Guernsey. I am currently on the Executive Committee of the CPA. There are, of course, 54 other nations in the Commonwealth (mostly English speaking) including India, a nation of 1 billion citizens, we should be reaching out to them and, as soon as Brexit is achieved, we will. Let's not forget the other myriad of nations around the globe. Send me; I will go!

The current states assembly has approved proposals for a Discrimination Ordinance, but much work needs to be done. How committed are you to ensuring that LGBTQ+ people, people of colour, people with disabilities and people of faith are protected on this island?

I voted for the anti-discrimination proposals. I oppose any form of discrimination whether against minorities or majorities.

What criteria do you use for decision making?

My knowledge or lack of it on a subject. The latter removed by research. I avoid hearsay and seek out expert advice and opinion (Local).

In the last two years two pieces of legislation have come to the States which specifically target the most vulnerable members of our society - euthanasia and abortion - where a person’s fundamental and basic right to life is overridden in the name of lesser rights. Do you believe that disposing of a person’s life is a sign of progress? Do you believe that failing to protect human life at any age or stage of development is the mark of a civilised and enlightened and caring society?

I voted against both these policies. They were introduced without reference to the wider public and without ever having figured in a manifesto at election. There was no widespread demand for Guernsey to try to be a pioneer in these fields - the introduction of euthanasia or the altering of the time up to which a termination could be permitted. I was particularly horrified by the idea that in some circumstances an abortion could be allowed right up to the moment before labour commenced and that no anaesthetic would be administered to revive the suffering of that child.

It is beyond time to invest in our people, infrastructure and public services. Do you plan to make the island's tax system more fair and progressive, so that more businesses and the wealthy pay a fairer share?

As I have said in my manifesto, increase[ing] tax or introduc[ing] new forms of taxation should be resisted, strong evidence shows that economies prosper under low taxation. Competition, free enterprise and public service should be encouraged.

In light of covid-19 and the hit that the tourist industry has taken what plans (if any) would you try to put in place to make Guernsey more attractive to tourists after travel bans are lifted? And do you feel tourism should play a more crucial role in Guernsey? If not, why?

The days of tourists coming to Guernsey in large numbers for their main holiday are passed. People want guaranteed sunshine. The current crisis means that travel has been restricted everywhere but as soon as flights began to operate tourists headed of to the Mediterranean and beyond. We have repositioned ourselves to cater for short stay visitors and that is where the future lies. Sea and air connectivity (particularly the latter for short stays) are vital. Aurigny is there for our future and we are fortunate that we have our own operator - sadly an expensive item at the moment but an item which had reduced costs and increased revenue considerably before March. An operator which is still flying daily and maintaining our links with the UK.

Please list in order of importance: - driving Guernsey’s economy - addressing social needs - protecting the environment - invest in Guernsey’s infrastructure and improve - sort out the schools - focus on air and sea links - extend the runway - implement revive and thrive as a priority - open our closed borders as a priority - reduce states expenditure

Not to duck the question - but these are all important. However, we must protect the economy as that is what pays for the rest. I would prioritise measures to ensure that the revenue stream is maintained. Competition, free enterprise and public service should be encouraged. There are two routes to prosperity: earn more or spend less. I prefer the latter. The runway extension can be deferred but some work should continue to investigate options and plan for work to begin when appropriate. Infrastructure projects, e.g. States Dairy relocation; Harbour refurbishment and/or redevelopment; improvements to sea defences should be accelerated but are of little use in providing major stimulus to the economy if contracts are awarded to firms outside the island. Local construction firms are already stretched. Finance provides 70% of our GVA, construction 4%. Social needs, the environment and schools are all hugely important and need to be kept at the forefront of Government thought. Parallel streams of progress which will continue to be worked on with urgency. Regarding borders - testing and quarantine are necessary whilst the virus is unchecked elsewhere. Vaccines are in preparation but may not arrive until next year.

List your achievements to date which have been a benefit to Guernsey.

I was always brought up never to blow my own trumpet therefore I find this question extremely difficult to answer. It is really for others to say how effective or ineffective I have been. But, not to duck the question I would say that on a political and parochial front I have served continuously on the Vale design for 17 years and for the past four years in the states of Guernsey. From a public service point of view I have been a life member of the Guernsey National Trust since 1974 and was for many years honorary Treasurer and in 2004-5 the vice president of the trust. I've been involved in the liberation day cavalcade committee organising that event for 20 years. From an employment perspective after taking early retirement from my engineering career, I was a secondary school teacher for 10 years from 2000.

Do you support a reduction in the cost of running the civil service? If so, how would you do that and over what timescale?

I can't imagine any candidate answering that question with a no. Hence the second part of the question how would it be brought about? I do not know. We have not seen any marked changes in working practices or cost reductions so far.

As we subsidise the airline, should Aurigny have a monopoly over all air routes to and from the Bailiwick, with a regulator to ensure fair pricing and a policy of not for profit?

This is a question which is currently being debated between Economic Development and STSB. ED has the mandate [to secure] the provision of, and [to promote], air and sea links to and from the Bailiwick. STSB carr[ies] out the States’ role as shareholder of any incorporated companies which are owned by the States,... which for the time being [includes] ... [Aurigny]. Clearly, any future policy decisions will affect Aurigny and we await further developments.

What is your view regarding commercialisation with respect to States owned entities?

As I have served as vice president of the STSB throughout its existence I am hardly likely to say that I am opposed to running the states assets as commercial undertakings. That is not to say that I see them as cash cows. The constant policy of the board has been to run the assets for the benefit of the people of Guernsey - that is to reinvest any surpluses back into the business and to try to pitch tariffs and charges at a level which does not constitute a stealth tax or a predatory pricing mechanism.

Should the island be spending tax payers money on maintaining air and sea links?

Within limits, yes. The fact that we own Aurigny is just that, a fact. It is vital for our Island that we maintain connectivity by air and through Gatwick and Southampton in particular. It is vital for the Bailiwick that we provide a lifeline service for Alderney. With regards to sea links, freight connections are essential and, fortunately, remain profitable. passenger traffic has fallen back during this difficult time and it remains to be seen whether it will recover or not. If sea connections were threatened it might be necessary to intervene either through subsidy or by purchasing out own vessels - we already own two ships which bring in our fuel supplies and whilst not easy it would be possible to gear up operations to include our own passenger/cargo vessel(s).

What is your view on future funding for long term care as current funding will be insufficient by 2040?

This was the topic of a recent debate and it was proposed that home owners should use part of the equity in their houses to partly fund the cost of their sheltered housing if they needed to be taken into a care home late in life. I opposed this policy and was part of the majority which rejected this proposal as being inequitable. The problem still exists and we will now have to see what alternative proposals are brought forward. With so many uncertainties surrounding the island's economy at the moment it is perhaps not the time to be thinking up new schemes. We have some time in hand but it is important that this matter is addressed soon.

What is your opinion of introducing a goods and sales tax?

I am opposed to this idea. It is an easy tax to introduce although the administrative bureaucracy is not negligible. It is inflationary as both the cost of goods and the cost to businesses in collecting the tax will be passed on to customers. It is regressive in that those least able to afford extra cost will be most disadvantaged whilst those with larger disposable incomes will feel the effect less. I think that there has never been a case where the tax was introduced at a modest rebate and quickly increased. In the UK it was 5% and is now 20% (admittedly this is a VAT not a GST) in Jersey it started at 3% and is now 5%.

Would you support the ‘listing’ of all remaining historic military structures, as Jersey has done, to ensure their ongoing protection, repair and maintenance?

I am in favour of listing buildings of historic significance but am aware that there are high cost implications for owners of such buildings. Aa a long term Hon Treasurers and one time vice_President of the National Trust of Guernsey and having many years ago fully restored a Georgian property, single-handed, I am well aware of the financial implications of maintaining an historic property.

What initiatives would you put in place to grow our economy?

As I have said in my manifesto, increas[ing] tax or introduc[ing] new forms of taxation should be resisted, strong evidence shows that economies prosper under low taxation. Competition, free enterprise and public service should be encouraged.

How will your religious faith influence your voting decisions?

My religious faith is only relevant in as much as it informs my conscience. In distinguishing between right and wrong I do not take account of the teaching of any established Church but rather of the accumulated wisdom of two and a half thousand years of moral philosophy.

Have you read the recommendations contained in the Frontier Economics Report in which they state that the long term benefits of extending the runway far outweigh the environmental and capital costs? If so, are you in favour of extending the runway?

I have read Frontier Economics report and it says "The economic benefits of extending the runway are likely to outweigh the costs over a 40 year period." which is not quite what your wrote. It further says, "annual greenhouse gas emissions would increase by up to 12 kilotonnes per year (equivalent to around 5% of Guernsey’s annual greenhouse gas emissions). The social cost of these emissions over the 40-year life of the project is around £9 million (net present value)." On the title page it says, "Provisional Analysis: findings will be reviewed in light of the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on air travel". Times have changed. Let's wait and see.

Do you support developing end of life care (including palliative care) or would you look to introduce a form of euthanasia as in assisted dying (assisted suicide)?

Yes to the first and no to the second proposition. I cannot accept, even at my relatively advanced age or possibly because of it, that there is any circumstance in which I would welcome state or third party intervention in the dying process.

Education - Do you know what T levels are and if you do, would you be enthusiastically demanding that they are available here in Guernsey?

The proposal in England is to introduce a range of courses over the next four years. I am not sure whether these will go ahead as planned this year due to the current difficulties. The subjects offered tend to be of a less academic nature and will involve classroom teaching combined with practical experience outside the school over a two year period. The end qualification will be the equivalent of three A Levels. I am not sure how enthusiastic I am, I would prefer to hold back for a while to see how they work out in England. Another possible difficulty in Guernsey might be in offering the full range of courses envisaged for England.

There is a lack of mental health support available - particularly to those who seem to fall into the apparent gap between the secondary and primary mental health services. What will you do to address this?

An important area of social need. I am not an expert in this field and would need to be advised on the best means to tackle this. One of my colleagues in the current States has first hand knowledge of the problems around this topic and this is an example of how Deputies can assist each other in understanding matters outside their immediate experience.

How would you as a deputy ensure emotive proposals such as, change to abortion law or assisted dying law would be publicly debated? And allow Islanders to have more of a say in these emotive issues.

I would welcome a wider debate. I think that we are often in danger of hearing only from a vocal minority who are not necessarily representative of society as a whole. However, how one carries forward the wish of the majority is problematic, the consultation on education held in 2015-16 went well didn't it?

What is your position on the opportunity to debate the abortion issue more openly and fairly with more balanced representations to the Deputies?

I would welcome a wider debate. I think that we are often in danger of hearing only from a vocal minority who are not necessarily representative of society as a whole. However, how one carries forward the wish of the majority is problematic, the consultation on education held in 2015-16 went well didn't it?

How do you see the way forward for secondary education in the island? Do you favour a particular model and if so which one?

I voted for the retention of the selection system but when that was defeated and got behind the committee who were charged with introducing the reformed system. That committee was subsequently replaced by yet another. When their proposals which were put forward did not receive support neither it seems did the next set of proposals which were then put forward hence the pause and review. My direct answer to your question is I would support a three school model as I feel it is more suitable for the islands infrastructure and culture. Larger schools do not necessarily lead to a better outturn.

Recognising the importance of our natural environment and our hospitality industry how would you propose to move forward essential repairs and any development at St Peter Port harbour, securing access to our beaches (e.g. Petit Port, Divette, Soldiers bay), the maintenance of our cliff paths and the important access from the bathing places to the Clarence battery? Does this essential maintenance take priority over the development of the East Coast/Town seafront?

Investment in our infrastructure over past decades has been inadequate. Harbour refurbishment and/or redevelopment; improvements to sea defences should be accelerated but these are of little use in providing major stimulus to the economy if contracts are awarded to firms outside the island. Local construction firms are already stretched. Finance provides 70% of our GVA, construction 4%. Social needs, the environment and schools are all hugely important and need to be kept at the forefront of Government thought. Parallel streams of progress which will continue to be worked on with urgency. Regarding borders - testing and quarantine are necessary whilst the virus is unchecked elsewhere. Vaccines are in preparation but may not arrive until next year.

What are your views about the proposed way forward with regard to Probate, recognising that the age-old system has been efficient, pastoral, and inexpensive? Are you of the view "if it ain't broke don't fix it"?

To take the second part of your question first I do not agree with the idea of change for changes sake. With regard to the first part regarding the probate court my view is the system is working efficiently and I cannot see it any advantage in changing it.

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