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  • Parish St Peter Port
  • Experience New Candidate
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Personal Statement

I was born in Scotland but am married to a local girl and have lived in Guernsey nearly 30 years. I have a degree in Modern Languages, Graduate Diplomas in English Law and Legal Practice, and qualifications in investment and compliance. I have worked in Guernsey’s Civil Service and at the Guernsey Financial Services Commission, and I now work in industry as a compliance specialist.

  • Our challenges – COVID, Brexit, constitutional threats, climate change
  • The way out – sustain the economy by playing to our financial strengths
  • Sustainability – future-proof Guernsey by developing green finance internationally and building a green economy locally
  • Get things done – increase the States’ efficiency by instituting clearer lines of authority, more effective decision-making, and tighter collective discipline

Manifesto

I would describe myself as a finance professional with an environmental and social conscience. This manifesto concentrates on my core interests, which are practical and economic. If we do not get these fundamentals right, then all else is just a wish-list. That said, my values are those of tolerance, respect and concern for all – and, within the limits of the possible, it will be my goal to promote a fair and secure society for every islander.

The crisis and the challenges

We face a unique set of challenges from multiple crises. COVID-19 has adversely impacted States’ finances with knock-on effects on employment, productivity and revenues. We also face pressure from outside – a worldwide slump, Brexit, international tax reform, and climate change. We cannot meet these challenges without major change.

Turning challenges into opportunities

We start with great advantages. Guernsey is agile, innovative, and business-friendly. We set our own policies and take our own measures. The States have realised the scale of the challenge and devised the Future Guernsey Plan ‘Revive and Thrive’. This deserves our support – the support of a ‘critical friend’, scrutinising policies for flaws or unfairness and keeping those responsible on track.

During COVID the actions of the Civil Contingencies Authority showed that important decisions can be taken swiftly and effectively with the right structures in place. We need to learn that lesson to equip ourselves to meet these challenges.

Within the States

A detailed overhaul of the machinery of government is needed. But this cannot be rushed and must be worked on during the new term. Meanwhile, to achieve efficiency, we must give the senior committee a more binding mandate and set timeframes for execution and implementation. Within the Assembly itself, more discipline is required: tighter agendas, timed speeches, and stricter rules of debate to prevent policy overturns through last-minute amendments.

Business policy

The finance industry will remain Guernsey’s economic mainstay for the foreseeable future. On it substantially depend almost all other sectors of the economy, from hospitality to construction. We have built up an excellent standard of regulation and a flexible regime, adopting and even leading on standards for tax compliance and fighting financial crime. This message needs persistent reinforcement in our contacts with the United Kingdom and beyond. Guernsey’s constitutional status is the foundation of our success, but it is not immune from challenge by our competitors, often large players who can turn in an instant from partners to adversaries. We must therefore protect our position and extend our reputation as a ‘safe haven’ not a ‘tax haven’.

We are even now becoming a centre of excellence for environmental sustainability, pioneering the regulated Green Fund and leading on green finance at the British-Irish Council. This process must be invigorated and the message emphasised that we are the domicile of choice for the green finance wave. There is no better opportunity to stimulate growth, aid recovery, and manage the environmental transition all in one.

Education

It is time to put the pro- and anti-selection debate behind us. We have made our choice and need to move on. Whatever the chosen model for our new schools, we must now focus on building a system fit for the 21st century. We must ensure that the entire workforce is educated to their full potential, since this will prove vital to Guernsey’s future competitiveness as a knowledge-based economy.

Transport & communications

Aurigny was acquired as a lifeline service, and so it proved during COVID. Now it could become an ‘economic enabler’, affording an opportunity to generate income and promote a national brand. The States’ subsidy requires protection but should cover the core lifeline only, with Aurigny free to develop other areas at its own risk and discretion. Meanwhile, inter-island links, particularly with Jersey, need to be improved – at sea and in the air. Thought should be given to rationalised arrangements for sea travel, perhaps together with Jersey’s government.

On land, environmentally friendly modes of transport should be encouraged – walking and cycling, with their attendant health benefits, as well as wider use of public transport. Electrification of private road transport should be a long-term goal, perhaps assisted through soft loans and tax breaks for the purchase of electric vehicles, and the installation of more recharging points.

Digital communication facilities must improve to meet modern expectations. The Future Guernsey Plan encourages the roll-out of 5G to build a digital economy, but we could go further and look at fibreoptic cables for a seamless interchange of data.

Energy

Our energy supply is vulnerable, as we saw in 2018 with the interruption to the fixed link. Now GE plan to install a direct link to the European Grid while encouraging local renewable generation. We can and should go further. Energy demands and household costs need to be reduced at source with a realistic revision of planning and building laws and financial support for home improvements such as roof-mounted solar panels, insulation, and electrification of domestic heating systems.

Health and Social policy

We face serious budget pressures from health and social care. The Partnership of Purpose and the Supported Living & Ageing Well Strategy will spread some of the load, but with an ageing population and more expensive medical, care costs will rise.

So, to pay for it all, it is vital to create good jobs, generate real income and sustain sufficient tax revenues. Our population deserves no less: a healthy population can only be built on a sound economy.

Answers to questions proposed by the public:

Most of the detailed work of the States is done in committees, like the Committee for Environment and Infrastructure. What experience do you have of being on a committee and how did you contribute?

No experience of sitting on a States Committee. I do have experience of sitting on or contributing to committees at work and for voluntary organisations - transport interest and other groups, and at university on student interest groups in the 1970s & 1980s.

With unemployment currently running at an all time high, what measures would you like in place to ensure local people are offered jobs before license holders ?

Guernsey already has legislation that effectively prioritises local jobseekers over migrant labour. An extended Future Guernsey Plan should lead to job creation that attracts predominantly local labour, particularly in construction. However, certain sectors are simply dependent on migrant labour - hospitality, social care and ancillary services, and certain specialist areas of financial services.

What concrete measures would you like to see implemented in Guernsey during the next term to achieve net zero carbon by 2050?

A programme for the thorough modernisation of the housing stock - domestic insulation, electrification of heating systems, roof-mounted solar panels, etc. with a partial relaxation of the planning laws. Encouragement to electrification of private transport and public transport with appropriate incentives - tax relief or soft loans. Diversification of energy generation - solar, offshore wind and, depending on the wider environmental impact, tidal power. Improved telecommunications to enable and encourage remote and home working.

I live in St Peter Port but have interests in the Vale, St Peters and Castel. Will you be looking at Island Wide issues or more so in your Parish of residence?

I will primarily consider island-wide issues since that is the basis of the new franchise. Island-wide and external issues are more predominant in our time. However, deputies must still consider issues within their parish, especially if there is an Island-wide dimension. It is unfortunate that local representation has been lost in the Assembly, but that has been a trend since the 1990s. (I would have favoured a mixture of Island-wide and district / parish representation.)

Are you concerned about the large amount of agricultural land that is being lost for private gardens?

Yes. Guernsey is already short of truly green space and often creation of private gardens leads to loss of habitat and the resident species. Nevertheless, former horticultural land often otherwise lies idle and unfit for use. Various schemes could be devised - long-leases to the States on condition of sub-letting to allotment gardeners, etc., but the risks and costs and demand would need to be scoped.

You will make many commitments as a politician, but how will you actually ensure these are achieved? If you have been a deputy before, what will you do differently this term to improve achievements?

I will sit as a non-party independent. I will not be whipped or otherwise cajoled into conformity with a particular view, except by exercising my own judgement and opinion. Even so, I do support the Future Guernsey Plan and better collective discipline within the Assembly and expect to vote largely in favour of those initiatives. I will do my best to honour my commitments, but it may sometimes be impossible, especially if I were outvoted on any matter, particularly on a committee.

What are your opinions on climate change and Guernsey's role in tackling it?

Climate change is a serious emergency which threatens the existence of our and other species. Local initiatives will help to ease the impact on the local environment - reduction of air pollution, but particularly reinforcing sea defences in low-lying coastal areas. Guernsey could have a huge indirect impact on tackling climate by continuing to expand as a centre of expertise and excellence for green finance. Investors will need flexible low-cost vehicles and expert services to facilitate finance for the environmental transition. As a green finance pioneer with a robust but flexible regulatory regime for professional investors, Guernsey is in an excellent position not only to benefit internally from green finance, but also to make a big contribution to the solutions for the wider world.

What are the attributes and skills you will be looking for in the next President of the Policy & Resources Committee?

The next president of P&R should exercise firm leadership by seeking consensus but insisting on adherence to that agreed consensus, except for points of principle. This requires largely diplomatic skills - understanding, patience and perseverance, willingness to listen in order to persuade, but also firm resolve to ensure adherence to consensus.

If the independent Cost Benefit Analysis supports lengthening the airport runway, would you vote in favour of investing in this key element of island infrastructure?

The case for runway extension seems weaker in the current state of the aviation market. The wider impact on the environment must also be considered against the gains. I remain open to persuasion, but at present I would vote against.

Do you believe that diversification of the island's tax base is an important consideration for Guernsey in today's volatile and fast-moving global economy? If so, how can this specifically be achieved for Guernsey?

Yes, but we would need to start with income tax - perhaps by introducing tax bands. Reduction of tax relief on debt and loans could also be explored - it can lead to excessive debt accumulation and asset bubbles. GST should be considered only as a last resort.

What are the candidates' views on maternity pay and leave and how would they improve the current arrangements, if at all?

The periods permitted for leave seem fair, but some employees could be disadvantaged if they are employed on casual contracts and may not qualify for the additional maternity leave period (14 weeks), even though they may have served the equivalent time as continuous service (15 months) - continuous service could be deemed if they have de facto served for that time.

I believe Guernsey needs a vision; a forward-thinking concept for the future of the island’s infrastructure, community wellbeing and economy. What’s yours?

I agree. My vision is for green infrastructure - electrify public and private transport, make energy-saving improvements to properties; improve telecommunications - fibre-optic cables. Diversify the economy - but above all support and promote green finance. An enhanced SLAWS programme would extend quality as well as quantity of life and allow older generations to stay in the community. Sound infrastructure underpins a strong secure economy.

Do you agree that people should be encouraged to use cars less and if so what measures would you like to see introduced to achieve this?

Yes. Public transport is now well supported. But some journeys still need private transport. Active travel should be encouraged, but that probably means better infrastructure for cycling. Car-sharing could also be encouraged. Homeworking - as we saw during lockdown - often means fewer journeys. Pupils can also be encouraged to take the bus to school or even walk!

Do you support outsourcing of States services?

Up to a point. The point is when services cannot be adequately monitored or supervised. Robust delivery and reporting requirements must be written into service level agreements.

What will you do to educate the islanders about the reality of the climate crisis which is the biggest threat currently facing the world?

The States have approved the Energy Policy and the Climate Change Policy and a Plan for Nature with a biodiversity strategy. Guernsey is also a pioneer of green finance. When these policies and initiatives are debated and reviewed, we should remind ourselves why we are doing these things - and I will point out the benefits and also insist within my available powers that the policies are implemented properly and in full.

Most environmental problems are caused by the love of growth. Would you consider de-growth?

I would consider "re-growth" or rather reconsider what is meant by "growth". Growth of wealth or value is often needed to sustain or advance society, but growth based on consumption is choking our planet. We should consider the content of the value - it should go beyond simply rent-seeking and produce wealth of benefit to society - say, investment in renewable energy generation or extraction of pollutants, or providing community services.

What intra island transport strategy would you support to ensure safe and ‘clean’ travel on island for all road users, pedestrians, cyclists and motorists? And how do you plan to deliver that plan financially?

Encourage electrification of private transport, more active travel, better infrastructure for cyclists and pedestrians - such as reversing priorities in particularly narrow lanes, categorisation of certain routes for predominantly cyclists and pedestrians. Much of this can only come out of general revenue, but the encouragement initiatives can also be supported by soft loans and tax relief.

What environmental policies would you support to reduce Guernsey’s reliance on the internal combustion engine, in support of International global warming initiatives?

Encourage electrification of private transport, more active travel, better infrastructure for cyclists and pedestrians - such as reversing priorities in particularly narrow lanes, categorisation of certain routes for predominantly cyclists and pedestrians. Much of this can only come out of general revenue, but the encouragement initiatives can also be supported by soft loans and tax relief.

What measures will you put in place during the next term to ensure that environmental biodiversity will be protected and enhanced?

The States have approved a Plan for Nature with a biodiversity strategy. Any infrastructure development under "Revive & Thrive" must take account of the Plan. The Plan itself should be constantly reviewed to ensure that it contains the necessary detail and measures.

The Guernsey Press had an article and a picture of a proposed East Coast development called HYDROPORT. It seemed to me to be a brilliant plan and included a new deep water harbour, a hydro electric supply by enclosing Belgrave bay and changes to St Peter port harbour to accommodate cruise liners and super yachts. It would provide jobs, produce an ongoing and substantial revenue stream and make us to some extent self-reliant on electricity, why has there been no update on this project?

I wonder if the silence is because it is a massive ambitious project with huge attendant risk. That said, it contains some really good ideas. Cruise liners may not post-COVID be such a great revenue stream. Super-yachts tend to favour Guernsey to take advantage of cheaper marine fuel duty. As we move away from fossil fuels and from encouraging their use, this revenue stream will probably decline and it does not fit well with a green economy and a green finance offering. I would also be extremely concerned at the possible loss of species habitat. I could only support it, if it can be developed with little or no environmental loss and without residential or commercial property, as a tidal lagoon with a barrage for renewable energy generation and perhaps an extra relief route for transport.

Do you agree that there is a climate crisis caused predominantly by the actions of humans?

Yes, it is self-evident. It is disingenuous or illusory to contend otherwise.

Longue Hougue has been proposed as a site for inert waste disposal despite it being a site of international importance in terms of wildlife. La Societe Guernesiase and other scientists have advised against this. What will you do to ensure that this valuable habitat is protected?

I would be extremely concerned at the possible loss of species habitat and access to the unique exposure of the St Peter Port Gabbro. I could only support it, if it can be developed with little or no environmental loss or damage. In the first instance we should consider ways of reducing the production of inert waste and extracting the waste itself for recycling. The shortlist contains some options for quarry-infill which should be used before Longue Hougue. But I would oppose any development of Longue Hougue that injures the natural and scientific interests.

Most scientists and experts agree that a target of 2050 to achieve ‘net zero’ carbon emissions is nowhere near ambitious enough and will have catastrophic consequences around the world. What will you do to ensure that Guernsey takes action to significantly reduce carbon emissions during the next term?

I will support and indeed promote any infrastructure projects that work towards reducing carbon emissions, including energy saving home improvement programmes, renewable energy generation, electrification of transport, and green finance in order to advance our contribution to the wider world.

What is your view on current spending on Aurigny, is it worth how much we are paying? Is it run efficiently? Did we need new aircraft?

Aurigny is a lifeline and we would be in a sorry state without it. The core "public service" obligations must be supported (Gatwick, Southampton and Alderney), but the other routes could be separated and run on a commercial basis, perhaps as a national brand. New aircraft would only be needed if a good case can be made. I could make an exception for proven electrically powered aeroplanes.

If elected, would you fully support the retention, repair and ongoing maintenance of the Sea Defences provided by the anti-tank wall at L’Ancresse Bay?

The anti-tank wall should be demolished as proposed and replaced with a modern defence. Other sea defences sorely need attention and resources should be applied to them - Fermain for example.

A significant proportion of the concerns about the two college model of secondary education related to the capital costs and space standards: they could have been addressed with higher spending. Would you be prepared to spend more money on the future model of secondary education than previously agreed by the States in September 2019? If so, how much more?

I would be prepared to spend the money if I could be convinced of the case. The two-school model would in an ideal world have met secondary-education requirements for Guernsey, but unfortunately the environmental impact seems to be too great in the limited land area available. Some form of three-school model will probably have to be adopted - if so, money will still have to match, because we need to get this right - the point of non-selective education is a decent standard of education for every pupil, which is vital in our knowledge-based economy.

With the general increase in costs of running the island and with various capital projects requiring funding; and with limitations on the amount that islanders can be taxed; do you think that it may be time to revisit the 0-10 tax scheme that created a big black hole in the island's finances?

Zero-10 is that - 0-10%. Many many companies are taxed at zero - some could be taxed more. However, the band should be extended only for certain types of activity - otherwise it may disincentivise business. Tax standards may need to be revisited again anyway - depending on international initiatives, but the impact on 0-10 at this point is unknown. We will continue to rely on income tax for the foreseeable future, but other revenue sources and borrowing unfortunately may need to be considered.

If elected, what priority will you give to the introduction of the already-drafted consumer protection legislation?

It deserves to be a high priority. Were it not for COVID, Brexit and ensuring that the island really does revive and thrive, it could have been near the top of my list. I would look for an opportunity to table it for approval if one arises. It is hard to believe that there is not even "Sale of Goods Act" type legislation in Guernsey in the 21st century.

Did you know that same-sex families aren't treated equally when it comes to registering the birth of a child? What will you do to change that?

The law was drafted before such situations were contemplated. If the actual parents taking responsibility for the child happen to be same sex, it seems fair to amend the law to allow them both to be registered.

Would you support a programme of privatisation of island utilities and other facilities such as Beau Sejour to help reduce record levels of borrowing resulting from the cost of Covid defences?

No. I would consider commercialisation of certain services and some tightly controlled outsourcing, but utilities are a strategic resource and you could regret losing control of them - Guernsey Telecom?

Increasing home working will likely result in surplus office space. Will you encourage an urgent revision of Planning Policies to facilitate conversion of retail and office space to residential & curb green-field development?

Yes. Remote and other flexible working need to be encouraged as part of modern working arrangements - although some physical premises will always be needed. There is no need to retain land and property for redundant purposes.

What is your attitude towards enhanced and mandatory registration, chipping and DNA recording of dogs and control of their fouling, island-wide?

It should become law at the earliest opportunity, but it must also compete with Revive & Thrive and post-COVID impact as well as Brexit, schools, health and much else.

I have one question for sitting Deputies and one for new candidates. Deputies:- what, in your mind, was your greatest political achievement in the last four years? New candidates:- What is your biggest political goal in the next four years?

To ensure that the States are reformed into an effective government and functioning Assembly in order to address the urgent challenges of our time.

How good are your mediation and conciliation skills? The key to the islands well-being and progress is in working together to achieve the projects approved - to see sustainable, innovative solutions. Leadership in pulling the team together to move forward, rather than in circles.

I have limited experience but I have observed enough to understand the importance of mediation and conciliation to achieving a lasting outcome. Dissent from consensus should be first explored rather than simply dismissed or suppressed. Viewpoints must be considered fully, whatever their perceived merit, and worthwhile aspects be taken and combined as components of an emerging consensus.

Would you support not giving Local Market licenses to those earning above a set level to support both LM and OM?

If you can live Open Market and not take up Local Market licences, then good. There are probably not many OM properties within the proper band, but prices are converging at the ends of the ranges, so more higher earners could be encouraged to do so.

First time buyers are encouraged to buy new build developments taking up green space, while there are vast amounts of listed properties facing dereliction on the island - buildings ripe for restoration, renovation and to be lived in. Currently, people are put off as they are greeted with stringent and outdated views by The Planning and Heritage Department - it takes too much time and money so are immediately put off. What will you do to change the process for the better?

Planning laws need reform - particularly some relaxation to encourage environmentally sound development on existing properties, particularly energy-saving measures. Such developments could enjoy tax relief, while empty properties could be subject to tax.

Would you support changes in the law to make cannabis for personal use legal?

Yes, for approved legitimate medical purposes. But not for recreational purposes until it can be proven safe to use (mental health impacts) and under a strict regulatory framework (licensing, market controls).

Question for New Candidates: During the COVID-19 lockdown States Meetings were held virtually. On 24th of June Meetings resumed in the Royal Court Chamber. As a prospective States Member have you spent any time at all in the public gallery observing our Parliament (potentially your future workplace) in action? If not, why not?

Yes, I have occasionally - a few years ago. I have also sometimes listened to the live radio coverage (though not for some time since).

In 1945, the generosity of people outside Guernsey enabled the delivery of Red Cross parcels to the island on the SS Vega. What is your view on the statement that ‘charity begins at home but should not end there’? How can we best show our care for people in need in other parts of the world?

I agree. We can contribute by supporting initiatives such as Fairtrade, but also continuing to provide funds for the Overseas Aid Committee. (Donations are now subject to tests of viability, value and impact.)

This is a question for new candidates; do you agree with the principle of scrutiny of government and if so how would you ensure that it was fairly carried out ?

Yes. It is vital for good government. The government structure needs overhaul to be more effective and better discipline is required in the Assembly. The senior committee as an interim measure should be given a more binding mandate. But the corollary must be enhanced scrutiny, and the Scrutiny Management Committee itself must be given a wider brief and greater powers.

Considering the mounting public pressure against the way our current justice system deals with cannabis offences, what is your stance on the legalisation and regulation of cannabis in Guernsey?

Yes, for legitimate medical purposes. But not for recreational purposes until it can be proven safe to use and under a strict regulatory framework.

In a review last year into drugs and treatments and States debate in January, HSC acknowledged that the disparity between life changing NICE TA drugs available in Guernsey compared to the NHS had become too great to be justified, with nearly 4000 patients now on sub-optimal treatments. The Guernsey Health Reserve was identified as the funding source. HSC announced last week a delay of at least a year to the implementation of this policy. How do you propose to tackle the pace at which change takes place within the States? Should you be held accountable for delivering on commitments you make individually, as a committee or collectively as the States?

This item should be a priority, but it must also compete with Revive & Thrive and post-COVID impact as well as Brexit, schools, and much else. I would look for an early opportunity to bring the issue forward. In normal circumstances you could expect at least moral accountability at any level, but in these times it could be unreasonable to expect more.

What ideas do you have to ensure there is affordable housing including support for first time buyers and ensure affordable rental property is available for locals so they can continue to live here? What is your stance on mortgage tax relief and shared ownership initiatives?

Sometimes help for first-time buyers just pushes up house prices again. Developers have also avoided building affordable housing. There are too many competing and conflicted interests. We need to consider a more joined-up approach - if possible, involve government, builders, community associations and lenders to develop a housing policy that will give as many people as possible a fair chance. Shared ownership is a basically good idea, but it needs to be more flexible to allow easier conversion of rent to mortgage or ownership. If mortgage tax relief is to be retained, so to be fair should there be assistance towards rent repayment, say tax relief there - but really it skews the incentive. A revised Dwelling Profits Tax Law could target speculative behaviour so as to restrain asset price inflation, which feeds the upward spiral.

Earlier this year, the States passed the introduction of life-saving and life-changing NICE-Approved drugs & medicines by a massive 32-1 vote; these drugs are readily available under the NHS and SHS in the UK. HSC have now announced that the implementation of this is now to be delayed by a year or so. Out of all projects the States have on their list - this has to be THE single most important one because it will affect up to 4,000+ residents of our island. How do you intend to bring forward the delay of this incredibly important topic to a much quicker implementation date?

This item should be a priority, but it must also compete with Revive & Thrive and post-COVID impact as well as Brexit, schools, and much else. I would look for an early opportunity to bring the issue forward. In normal circumstances you could expect at least moral accountability at any level, but in these times it could be unreasonable to expect more.

What would you do to address traffic noise pollution from vehicles speeding and backfiring along St Georges Esplanade/Les Banques and towards town?

Introduce MOTs and noise pollution legislation and ban offensive models of car and / or require refitting to prevent the production of noise. Unfortunately it may need to be based on decibel levels, which is not a comprehensive criterion. it must also compete for priority with COVID, Brexit and implementing "Revive & Thrive". Electrification of private transport will help and I will promote this at every opportunity, but we are a long way from that.

In January 2020 the States passed a policy to make all NICE TA drugs and treatments available to Islanders. Do you see this as a priority and if so how would you expedite implementation?

This item should be a priority, but it must also compete with Revive & Thrive and post-COVID impact as well as Brexit, schools, and much else. I would look for an early opportunity to bring the issue forward. In normal circumstances you could expect at least moral accountability at any level, but in these times it could be unreasonable to expect more.

The recent Frontier report on the runway extension summed up that "the economic benefits of extending the runway are likely to outweigh the costs" with net benefits over 40 years of up to £687m (over £20k per household). Post COVID, do you support continued investigation into the potential for a runway extension to improve Guernsey's infrastructure, air links, and sustain the visitor economy?

The case for runway extension seems weaker in the current state of the aviation market. The wider impact on the environment must also be considered against the gains. I remain open to persuasion, but at present I would vote against.

Have you been made aware that every report that the SOG has commissioned for 20 years has flagged the need to extend the runway to circa 1700m+ and the commercial benefits it will bring for the island as a whole?

The case for runway extension seems weaker in the current state of the aviation market. The wider impact on the environment must also be considered against the gains. I remain open to persuasion, but at present I would vote against.

Brexit presents a unique opportunity for Guernsey to strengthen its ties with other Commonwealth countries and stand on its own two feet on an international scale. Would you be willing to make an effort to strengthen our diplomatic ties to countries like New Zealand, Australia, and Canada?

It should be pursued as a matter of course - it should not need Brexit which in my view is will have mostly negative impacts on everyone. Unfortunately Brexit does not strengthen the Bailiwick's position in the world - we lose Protocol 3 and now depend entirely on the UK's foreign policy for our relations with the outside world. We have no diplomatic service of our own. At least British diplomacy will still include relations with open societies like Canada, New Zealand and to a certain extent Australia.

The current states assembly has approved proposals for a Discrimination Ordinance, but much work needs to be done. How committed are you to ensuring that LGBTQ+ people, people of colour, people with disabilities and people of faith are protected on this island?

Social justice and equal treatment should be a priority. The discrimination legislation is to be implemented gradually and progress could be retarded because of the substantial issues facing the Assembly in the next term - post-COVID and post-Brexit spending, spending on health, social care, education and various other issues: these are likely to take greater priority, and I would largely agree. However, I would not like discrimination issues to be forgotten and elements could be brought forward piecemeal. This is not ideal, but it may be the only feasible way not to lose sight of the matter.

What criteria do you use for decision making?

Analysis and assessment - analyse the problem, identify the mischief, target the mischief with a solution, devise or consider appropriate solution(s) - and crucially ensure that it's fair and proportionate, assess and allocate the resources available, can more resources be - what's the problem, what's the solution and is it feasible? I think I have described a process rather than criteria, but the criteria are embedded in the process.

In the last two years two pieces of legislation have come to the States which specifically target the most vulnerable members of our society - euthanasia and abortion - where a person’s fundamental and basic right to life is overridden in the name of lesser rights. Do you believe that disposing of a person’s life is a sign of progress? Do you believe that failing to protect human life at any age or stage of development is the mark of a civilised and enlightened and caring society?

I would not pose the question in that way. I do not see abortion as a rights issue. Rather it is provision for desperately difficult cases in an imperfect world. Voluntary euthanasia can be seen as a rights issue, but again in certain cases it might simply be seen as compassionate. Nevertheless, I remain to learn of a sufficiently safe system for permitting voluntary euthanasia because it is so difficult to be sure that consent is given lawfully, freely and with full mental capacity and free from influence or interference.

It is beyond time to invest in our people, infrastructure and public services. Do you plan to make the island's tax system more fair and progressive, so that more businesses and the wealthy pay a fairer share?

I agree with the sentiment. I would revisit income tax bands and consider GST only as a last resort. I would like to distinguish between businesses and investment that benefit society and the environment - eligible for tax relief - and those that add little value to society or damage the environment - attracting a different tax rate. Many ordinary businesses, however, do benefit society just by employing people and paying tax, and employment and revenue will be sorely need in the next term - they could be treated neutrally.

In light of covid-19 and the hit that the tourist industry has taken what plans (if any) would you try to put in place to make Guernsey more attractive to tourists after travel bans are lifted? And do you feel tourism should play a more crucial role in Guernsey? If not, why?

Guernsey is an expensive place to visit. To make it affordable migrant labour needs to be available and transport links need to be robust. Guernsey could capitalise more on its historic past as an attraction: Victor Hugo, the Occupation, the Calvinist Reformation, Privateering Days, etc., etc.

Please list in order of importance: - driving Guernsey’s economy - addressing social needs - protecting the environment - invest in Guernsey’s infrastructure and improve - sort out the schools - focus on air and sea links - extend the runway - implement revive and thrive as a priority - open our closed borders as a priority - reduce states expenditure

implement revive and thrive as a priority - protecting the environment - invest in Guernsey’s infrastructure and improve - driving Guernsey’s economy (these are interlinked); - addressing social needs - sort out the schools - focus on air and sea links (these require the revenues from most of the first batch) - extend the runway - open our closed borders as a priority - reduce states expenditure (which will be difficult post-Covid, post-Brexit, in face of climate change, to remodel secondary education)

List your achievements to date which have been a benefit to Guernsey.

New candidate, so: paying taxes; working and contributing to the economy

Do you support a reduction in the cost of running the civil service? If so, how would you do that and over what timescale?

Yes, but on merit. A review could be conducted by external reviewers, but with an understanding of local conditions - local consultants preferably. The panel could however include some off-Island reviewers or consultants in a minority, who could bring an outside view for balance. Timeframe would depend on the length of the review.

As we subsidise the airline, should Aurigny have a monopoly over all air routes to and from the Bailiwick, with a regulator to ensure fair pricing and a policy of not for profit?

The public service obligation should be defined and supported (Gatwick, Southampton, Alderney) and the remainder run on a commercialised basis as a "national brand" with no obligation to subsidise such routes and allowing partnerships or joint ventures with other carriers. The PSO routes should be subject to independent regulation and fair pricing. The commercialised routes sink or swim by the market. If a route originally launched on commercial lines proves vital to continuing welfare (e.g., Jersey, Isle of Man, Manchester), it could be considered by the regulator for re-categorisation as PSO.

What is your view regarding commercialisation with respect to States owned entities?

To be implemented with care. Certain parts of certain services could be or already are commercialised - Beau Sejour, Aurigny, Guernsey Post - but it is vital for strategic reasons to retain States control of key elements of infrastructure: roads, service lines, etc. Unfortunately the States ceded control of Guernsey Telecom entirely, when now it could have upgraded telecommunications infrastructure on both a public and commercialised basis.

Should the island be spending tax payers money on maintaining air and sea links?

We already do and may need to continue to do so. The aviation industry is in a dire situation and if we did not have Aurigny, the situation would be even more dire. Condor, too, now faces difficult circumstances and the Islands may need to co-ordinate and co-operate to resolve the situation. Public transport and lifeline routes rarely make money all the time. Sometimes money-makers can cross-subsidise the loss-makers. Vulnerable routes in certain communities have had to be nationalised to maintain the service - such as with Isle of Man Steam Packet and CalMac.

What is your view on future funding for long term care as current funding will be insufficient by 2040?

In the short to medium term a flexible and attractive regime should be introduced to recruit local and migrant labour to support an enhanced SLAWS strategy - where possible people should be supported in their own homes. Measures - such as mean-tested assistance - should introduced to enable those to move into residential care without too much damage to personal heritable wealth. In the long term we may need to consider an insurance-based system, similar to the system for secondary health care (MSG).

What is your opinion of introducing a goods and sales tax?

I would prefer income tax bands in the first instance, then differentiated business taxes - differentiated for societal and environment impact, and finally in the last resort GST (because of the disproportionate effect on the less well-off.)

Would you support the ‘listing’ of all remaining historic military structures, as Jersey has done, to ensure their ongoing protection, repair and maintenance?

Yes, although for me it is not a high priority. Protection, repair and maintenance could form a project within "Revive & Thrive" and help to provide a specialist tourist offering.

What initiatives would you put in place to grow our economy?

"Revive & Thrive" is the start, but it needs content. Upgrade the housing stock - assistance for domestic insulation, roof-mounted solar panels, double- and triple-glazing installation and replacement. Roll-out 5G and where possible, fibre-optic. Fibre-optic to the desk would be a great economic enabler. Repair neglected infrastructure - sea defences. Diversify electricity generation - offshore wind, solar power and depending on the environmental impact, tidal power. Encourage investment into digital initiatives such as fintech software and green investments - building on the GFSC and Guernsey Finance initiatives.

Do you believe that the rates of income support are a) too low b) about right or c) too high? Explain your answer in some detail.

I do not have enough knowledge to answer in detail. I suspect that income support may be on the low side because of the sheer high cost of living in Guernsey.

How will you support and encourage young people coming to the island with regards to housing and licencing to ensure the island has more stable tax base as the population ages?

Guernsey legislation effectively prioritises local jobseekers over migrant labour. However, certain sectors are simply dependent on migrant labour - hospitality, social care and ancillary services, and certain specialist areas of financial services and education. Many potential migrants - and indeed returning former residents - are deterred by the cost of living - especially housing. The problem would need to be tackled in two parallel directions - more flexible migration and work-permit schemes and a more co-ordinated affordable and social housing programme, which I have answered in more detail under other questions.

How will your religious faith influence your voting decisions?

I have no religious faith but I am tolerant of other people's faiths.

Have you read the recommendations contained in the Frontier Economics Report in which they state that the long term benefits of extending the runway far outweigh the environmental and capital costs? If so, are you in favour of extending the runway?

No, only press reports. The case for runway extension seems weaker in the current state of the aviation market. The wider impact on the environment must also be considered against the gains. I remain open to persuasion, but at present I would vote against.

What are your views on the cost of Primary Healthcare locally and what innovative ideas do you have that don’t simply involve ‘redirecting funding from a different states pot’ to create fair, equitable and affordable access to Primary Care for all islanders?

In the first instance it may come to redirecting funding, but a better solution needs to be found. We may be too far away from achieving an NHS-style system, but an insurance-based system as for secondary healthcare may need to be considered, especially with the demographic pressures - increases in the ageing population, including the "uninsured", declining workforce, social care demands. The GP co-payment has not kept pace. The Health Improvement Commission could also continue to receive support and so help to reduce demand by encouraging healthier lifestyles, but of course it cannot be expected to produce a constant reliable reduction in ill health.

Do you support developing end of life care (including palliative care) or would you look to introduce a form of euthanasia as in assisted dying (assisted suicide)?

I would prefer to develop end-of-life care as the first option, but I see a case for voluntary euthanasia to be permitted IF a safe system can be devised - but I am yet to learn of such a sufficiently safe system.

Education - Do you know what T levels are and if you do, would you be enthusiastically demanding that they are available here in Guernsey?

I know of them only in the barest outline, but they seem a good idea deserving support. The Guernsey Institute would be best placed to deliver them perhaps in partnership with the Sixth-Form College for those that want to mix and match. Guernsey is now a knowledge-based economy and needs a mixture of academic, professional and technical skills and education to remain so.

What will you do to help Guernsey businesses revive and thrive and make Guernsey a 'smarter' and technologically advanced place to do business, and to encourage new start up businesses?

"Revive & Thrive" is a good start, but needs content. Roll-out 5G and where possible, fibre-optic. Fibre-optic to the desk would be a great economic enabler. Encourage investment into digital initiatives such as fintech software. A good digital infrastructure could support new finance initiatives and green investments - building on the GFSC and Guernsey Finance initiatives.

There is a lack of mental health support available - particularly to those who seem to fall into the apparent gap between the secondary and primary mental health services. What will you do to address this?

I see scope within the Partnership for Purpose to address the issue, particularly gaps between primary and secondary healthcare. There is a risk that mental health gets left behind or forgotten among the competing priorities, but since the partners include the Health Improvement Commission and QRMP, a primary care provider, raising awareness of mental health problems and early identification of them could be explicitly included within the remit, including legibility for resourcing. Mental health has impacts on wider society and the economy.

How would you as a deputy ensure emotive proposals such as, change to abortion law or assisted dying law would be publicly debated? And allow Islanders to have more of a say in these emotive issues.

Often these matters are put out to consultation, which is generally fine in principle, but tends to attract those with strong views or with interests in the matter. Referenda produce variable results of similarly variable quality. I am impressed with some of the results of citizens' assemblies, which have apparently produced informed and considered outcomes with widespread support. This approach could be tried in Guernsey for such emotive subjects.

What is your position on the opportunity to debate the abortion issue more openly and fairly with more balanced representations to the Deputies?

Often these matters are put out to consultation, which is generally fine in principle, but tends to attract those with strong views or with interests in the matter. Referenda produce variable results of similarly variable quality. I am impressed with some of the results of citizens' assemblies, which have apparently produced informed and considered outcomes with widespread support. A range of expert opinion could be included as evidence to such an assembly or panel. This approach could be tried in Guernsey for such difficult, emotive and sensitive subjects.

How do you see the way forward for secondary education in the island? Do you favour a particular model and if so which one?

The two-school model would in an ideal world have met secondary-education requirements for Guernsey, but unfortunately the environmental impact seems to be too great in the limited land area available. Some form of three-school model with separate Sixth-Form College will probably have to be adopted. The Guernsey Institute could also deliver some of the further or advanced secondary education to post-16 - technical, vocational and/or academic.

Recognising the importance of our natural environment and our hospitality industry how would you propose to move forward essential repairs and any development at St Peter Port harbour, securing access to our beaches (e.g. Petit Port, Divette, Soldiers bay), the maintenance of our cliff paths and the important access from the bathing places to the Clarence battery? Does this essential maintenance take priority over the development of the East Coast/Town seafront?

"Revive & Thrive" should address reinstatement of and repairs to neglected infrastructure, including or especially sea defences, but also public natural amenities. I can see the attraction of developing the Eastern Seaboard, but I would be extremely concerned at the possible loss of species habitat. I could only support such a project, if it can be developed with little or no environmental loss and without residential or commercial property. I might consider a tidal lagoon with a barrage for renewable energy generation, but again dependent on the environmental impact.

What are your views about the proposed way forward with regard to Probate, recognising that the age-old system has been efficient, pastoral, and inexpensive? Are you of the view "if it ain't broke don't fix it"?

In my view it is anachronistic and perhaps administratively cumbersome to have a separate ecclesiastical court. The court - more particularly its probate function - should simply be merged with the Royal Court and the records included in Greffe records. If done carefully, that should not affect the operation of the probate laws themselves.

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